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olex

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  1. You can probably just use the same preventDefault technique on events other than just "contextmenu":E.g. for drag: $(this).bind("ondragstart", function(e) { e.preventDefault(); }); $(this).bind("drag", function(e) { e.preventDefault(); }); This would also disable dragging for other purposes, it's probably best to just target img tags with your event handlers, like so: $("img").bind... Nevertheless, someone could easily go into the HTML inspector and pull out your image out of the page. You can't prevent a developer or someone determined from snagging the image.
  2. Usually the Enter key starts a new paragraph. Depending on your CSS, the space between elements is usually large. You can use Shift-Enter to insert <br/> which are line-breaks within the same paragraph. If you never want the space between paragraphs (e.g. new paragraphs have the same spacing as if you had continued your text to span multiple lines) - you can just inspect to find what CSS rule is responsible for that margin and remove it in your CSS. I can update my answer with the CSS you need to add if you link me to an example page.
  3. TLDR: You can upload DSLR photos and they will be optimized to approximately the right size before being served, so your users aren’t downloading the original image. Squarespace’s ImageLoader already looks at the size of your container and picks the appropriate size to load so that the image fits. Retina is accounted for, and people on retina screens get larger images that load slower. You can use your web browser’s developer tools (typically: right click and hit “Inspect Element” on any image on your site). There should be a big URL that’s clickable in the tools interface, like: <img … lots of stuff … src="http://THIS…?format=500w"> – that last bit, format, tells you which version of your image got loaded. You can upload a gigantic DSLR photo for your homepage thumbnails, but if you see the format=XXXXw thing, it’s actually a scaled down version of your image, where the Width is whatever XXXX is.
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