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Multilingual site with Avenue template

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Hi there,

 

I am making a new website for my mom to display some of her paintings.

I selected the template Avenue which is perfect to display images of her painting. 

However, I am now stuck to create a button which could switch the website from english to french and vice versa.

Normally I would have both in a folder however the 'Index' pages are similar to Folders and I can't slide Index pages into Folders...

 

Ideally, I would like to have the exact same website but just add a flag button (english/french) top right corner to switch from the French version to the English one - see image attached.

One option is to have two website but it means I would need to pay two account which is unfortunately not a viable option for me.

 

Looks like I am not the only one struggling with this:

https://answers.squarespace.com/questions/127231/how-can-i-create-a-multilingual-site-using-avenue.html

https://answers.squarespace.com/questions/125310/manage-multilingual-site-dummy-approach.html

 

If you have other suggestion, I am all ears!

 

Cheers,

Romain

Main page & website structure.png

One category of paintings under the Index page.png

Index leading to 6 categories of paintings.png

Pages in english unlinked.png

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Hi Romain

You can host both languages on one site if you only want to display the pictures. If you want commerce facilities, it is not currently possible to checkout in more than one language or currency, because you cannot translate the checkout content. 

There's a straightforward way to show two languages by giving your pages URLs that indicate the language, for example /en/contact and /fr/contact and then add some code to recognise this. Brad wrote an excellent guide called How to setup Multi-language content on any Squarespace template.

On the subject of flags, you'd assume that users would find flags quicker than text, but as a UX designer I can tell you that text is better.

For example, English could be represented by many different flags, so whichever flag you choose, user testing shows that a proportion of the visitors won't relate to the flags, some may even find them offensive. For example, Canadian visitors won't find the Union Jack or the French Tricolour as relevant as Europeans.

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  • 2 months later...
On 10/14/2019 at 4:31 PM, paul2009 said:

Hi Romain

You can host both languages on one site if you only want to display the pictures. If you want commerce facilities, it is not currently possible to checkout in more than one language or currency, because you cannot translate the checkout content. 

There's a straightforward way to show two languages by giving your pages URLs that indicate the language, for example /en/contact and /fr/contact and then add some code to recognise this. Brad wrote an excellent guide called How to setup Multi-language content on any Squarespace template. On the subject of flags, you'd assume that users would find flags quicker than text, but as a UX designer I can tell you that text is better. For example, English could be represented by many different flags, so whichever flag you choose, user testing shows that a proportion of the visitors won't relate to the flags, some may even find them offensive. For example, Canadian visitors won't find the Union Jack or the French Tricolour relevant as relevant as Europeans.

100% !! Unless flags cover every country they're irritating and in [IE] case offensive. I'm less likely to buy from a website that incorrectly localises me to the wrong country, or forces me to pick a national flag I don't want to pick. Furthermore different territories and countries use different language variants - for example, centre/center, jumper/pullover/sweater, as well as different 'natural measurements' so unless you're 100% localising, always better to use words for languages. A great example of a localised site is microsoft, where they offer each country AND multiple languages, but that's not really applicable to a squarespace site - it's just a well implemented and culturally sensitive example of localisation:

Screenshot 2019-12-28 17.15.37.png

Screenshot 2019-12-28 17.15.16.png

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